It Gets Better Project

« itgetsbetter.org

If you are considering hurting yourself or need help, call The Trevor Project at 866-4-U-TREVOR (866-488-7386), or call The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

If you think you need help, there are always people here to support you.

In Canada?

For anonymous and free support and counseling services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, please call Kids Help Phone at 1-800-668-6868. To ask a question online, visit kidshelpphone.ca.

Blogs We Follow


#gender

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Quick Queer History
Color Me Gender
Can You Name The Famous Child of American History Above?
Above sits Franklin D. Roosevelt. Yes, as in the 32nd President of United States of America. This picture of Roosevelt was snapped in 1884 when FDR was 2 ½ years old. During this time in American culture it was a common practice for young boys to wear dresses until they were 6 or 7 years old.
Wait, dresses?
Yes. Dresses were considered gender neutral clothing and colors were not directed towards males or females. Pastel colors started to be marketed more heavily for children in the mid-19th century without distinction towards any particular gender. It wasn’t until after World War I that businesses started marketing colors towards specific assigned genders.
During the turn of the 20th century, around the late 1910s, some companies started to market specific colors. At this time, blue was marketed to young girls and red to young boys. Historically, blue is attributed more often to women, such as in representations of the goddess or the Virgin Mary and pink was often attributed to men as a color of power and war.
With a pinch of irony, the raging Flapper movement introduced mainstream consumers to gender assigned clothing. By 1927, blue was being marketed to young boys and pink to young girls.
The practice is less than 90 years old. So next time your grandparents or parent comment on how you are dressed or the color scheme of your closet, you can simply reply that you are living like your grandparents/great-grandparents did when they were children – without boundries.          
And Now You  KNOWhomo|tumblr

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Quick Queer History

Color Me Gender

Can You Name The Famous Child of American History Above?

Above sits Franklin D. Roosevelt. Yes, as in the 32nd President of United States of America. This picture of Roosevelt was snapped in 1884 when FDR was 2 ½ years old. During this time in American culture it was a common practice for young boys to wear dresses until they were 6 or 7 years old.

Wait, dresses?

Yes. Dresses were considered gender neutral clothing and colors were not directed towards males or females. Pastel colors started to be marketed more heavily for children in the mid-19th century without distinction towards any particular gender. It wasn’t until after World War I that businesses started marketing colors towards specific assigned genders.

During the turn of the 20th century, around the late 1910s, some companies started to market specific colors. At this time, blue was marketed to young girls and red to young boys. Historically, blue is attributed more often to women, such as in representations of the goddess or the Virgin Mary and pink was often attributed to men as a color of power and war.

With a pinch of irony, the raging Flapper movement introduced mainstream consumers to gender assigned clothing. By 1927, blue was being marketed to young boys and pink to young girls.

The practice is less than 90 years old. So next time your grandparents or parent comment on how you are dressed or the color scheme of your closet, you can simply reply that you are living like your grandparents/great-grandparents did when they were children – without boundries.          

And Now You  KNOWhomo|tumblr


t-r-a-n-s:

A gender 101 resource for anyone and everyone!
Fully illustrated and colorful resource that’s a 09-page hardback book, and available online for free or your love donation. Learn more at thegenderbook.com

t-r-a-n-s:

A gender 101 resource for anyone and everyone!

Fully illustrated and colorful resource that’s a 09-page hardback book, and available online for free or your love donation. Learn more at thegenderbook.com


We support you to express (or not express) your gender however you like! We hope one day that all #LGBT youth will be able to dress as they feel, no matter where they are in the world.Share this graphic with your friends and family to show them you agree! #illustrationswww.itgetsbetter.org/arzola5

We support you to express (or not express) your gender however you like! We hope one day that all #LGBT youth will be able to dress as they feel, no matter where they are in the world.

Share this graphic with your friends and family to show them you agree! #illustrations

www.itgetsbetter.org/arzola5


We love this video from our friends at the American Institute of Bisexuality. It’s from when the Project first started! Enjoy.


It gets better when we allow our children to make their own decisions of what toys they want to play with.

www.itgetsbetter.org/arzola2

It gets better when we allow our children to make their own decisions of what toys they want to play with.

www.itgetsbetter.org/arzola2


We applaud Facebook for continually creating the necessary change to be inclusive of our community! We hope that other organizations follow Facebook’s lead to give respect to all identities.

We applaud Facebook for continually creating the necessary change to be inclusive of our community! We hope that other organizations follow Facebook’s lead to give respect to all identities.