It Gets Better Project

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transgenderstudentlife:

thespookyhomosexual:

thespookyhomosexual:

A trans* guide I made for an infographic assignment in my English class.
I hope everything is fitting, if you notice something is off, not correct, or could be improved please let me know. I would hate to have anyone feeling left out or marginalized.
Edit: I forgot to say that for this assignment we had to work within a limited space to display as much information as possible. I attempted to cover the more generalized terms, as my “target audience” would be those who have no exposure to trans* identities.

Edit: Thanks for the feedback, everybody. It’s been great. I took out some parts that were rough, vague, or maybe not the best. Hope it is better.

Regarding the first two boxes on the top left:
(1) MtF and FtM are not great terms to use if you’re trying to present gender as a spectrum rather than a binary (which I’m assuming you’re doing because you’ve included genders outside the binary on this infographic). What about using “Trans woman” or “Transgender woman?”
(2) In the descriptions, using the word “but” implies that the person’s identity is in opposition with what they were assigned at birth, which in turn alludes to and reinforces the gender binary. If gender is a spectrum, there are no two inherent “opposing” identities. The idea that there are only two genders and that they oppose each other is part of what is socially constructed about gender.  What do you think about the following: “A woman who was assigned male a birth.” or “A woman who was assigned male at birth; identifies as female.”
Regarding the “Third Gender” description:
I’ve never seen this definition before; it’s interesting. You may want to associate in which culture(s) the Two-Spirit identity/role appears. This is not a term for just anyone to use; it is specific to certain culture(s) and people should know that.

transgenderstudentlife:

thespookyhomosexual:

thespookyhomosexual:

A trans* guide I made for an infographic assignment in my English class.

I hope everything is fitting, if you notice something is off, not correct, or could be improved please let me know. I would hate to have anyone feeling left out or marginalized.

Edit: I forgot to say that for this assignment we had to work within a limited space to display as much information as possible. I attempted to cover the more generalized terms, as my “target audience” would be those who have no exposure to trans* identities.

Edit: Thanks for the feedback, everybody. It’s been great. I took out some parts that were rough, vague, or maybe not the best. Hope it is better.

Regarding the first two boxes on the top left:

  • (1) MtF and FtM are not great terms to use if you’re trying to present gender as a spectrum rather than a binary (which I’m assuming you’re doing because you’ve included genders outside the binary on this infographic). What about using “Trans woman” or “Transgender woman?”
  • (2) In the descriptions, using the word “but” implies that the person’s identity is in opposition with what they were assigned at birth, which in turn alludes to and reinforces the gender binary. If gender is a spectrum, there are no two inherent “opposing” identities. The idea that there are only two genders and that they oppose each other is part of what is socially constructed about gender.  What do you think about the following: “A woman who was assigned male a birth.” or “A woman who was assigned male at birth; identifies as female.”

Regarding the “Third Gender” description:

  • I’ve never seen this definition before; it’s interesting. You may want to associate in which culture(s) the Two-Spirit identity/role appears. This is not a term for just anyone to use; it is specific to certain culture(s) and people should know that.

(Source: tightbuttholeprivilege, via gender-and-sexual-education)


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    gender some crazy shit, so learn it
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